More on Deck Andrews

Continuing with Gerald Nathan Hodgson’s Northwest family narrative, with thanks to Michael Howard Hodgson:

Deck had a reputation for being a hard man to get along with and people warned Dad that he wouldn’t stay there long. However, Dad demonstrated both physical strength and personal independence from the start and Deck was more considerate toward him than he might have been otherwise; also Dad took pride in doing a full day’s work and doing it well. there are two other incidents abut Deck that I will mention:

Deck had made a deal with a cattle buyer to deliver to the railway stockyard a certain number of cattle at a certain price. He had business in Chicago and since the deal had been made he took the train out, leaving Dad to deliver the cattle and receive the check. Dad (about seventeen years old at the time) delivered the cattle, but when the check was offered, he found it was made out for much less than the agreed on price. Although some older men who were around advised him to take the check he refused and went home. He knew Deck was supposed to be home and that they couldn’t ship the cattle out till around noon the next day. Deck got home and Dad explained. Deck asked Dad, “What would you have done if I hadn’t got home?” Dad says, “I’d have gone to the station agent and had the car stopped till payment was made.” Deck says, “Wal, I don’t know now, but I’ll go in the morning early and talk to old Cal.”

Cal was his brother and a lawyer. So Deck went to town the next morning and returned later in high good humor. “You know, Old Cal told me to do just to same thing you did. I went to the station agent first then bought a newspaper and sat in the hotel lobby till the buyer came to look for me, The buyer came up — all sweetness and apologies and gave me a check for the agreed amount.” The buyer would have had to have released the cattle if he hadn’t paid and the railroad would have charged him for the car just the same — also demurrage, if he had delayed.

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.