Generation two: Robert and Elizabeth Hodgson

Robert Hodgson (before 1581- buried 7 November 1655); he married 27 October 1623 Elizabeth Rogers; to them, known sons John and George.

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Surviving Cumbria parish records pick up with Robert Hodgson’s family:

Robt Hodgshon married Elsabeth Roger 27 October 1623 (no locator).
Robert Hodgshon of Murton buried 7 November 1655.
Elizabeth Hodgson, wife of Robert of Murton, buried 16 December 1634.
John Hodgshon
, son of Robert of Murton, baptised 14 December 1631; crucially, the Pardshaw Quaker records note two sons born to John and Eliner of Lamplugh – Robert, born 9th month 10, 1666, and George Hodgson, born 8th month 2, 1668; as well as the burial 11th month 30, 1675, of John Hodgson of Murton in Lamplugh.
George Hodgson, son of Robert of Murton, baptised 21 August 1634.

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One of the things I noticed with the parish records posted online is a large gap regarding the Hodgsons, making me wonder if many of the family joined with the Independent church of the Puritans or with other sects. In reply, Chris Dickinson noted, “There are some things about Lamplugh in the seventeenth century that you need to know in order to make judgments about the evidence.

“The northern half of Lamplugh and Arlecdon parishes was pretty much under the control of the Lamplughs of Lamplugh Hall (who were Lords of the Manor of Lamplugh & Arlecdon).

“The Lamplugh parish register started in 1581 and was kept in an orderly fashion. It was maintained even during the Civil War and Interregnum, which was unusual. Unfortunately, it wasn’t maintained from 1660 to the mid-1680s, when George Lamplugh (brother of John Lamplugh of Lamplugh Hall) was rector. This gap can make tracing some individuals and families difficult.”

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Generation three: John and Eliner Hodgson

In the case of tracing my Hodgsons, this Lurgan Friends Meeting minute from 1701 provides a crucial link to Murton in Lamplugh:

Robert Hodgson, son of John and Elinor was born in Cumberland, 5th mo 1668, and came to Ireland in 1682 and on the 20th of 9th mo, 1701 took to wife Sarah, daughter of Wm Nicholson and Isable, born in Armagh.

Pardshaw minutes previously cited the husband of Elinor/Eliner as John Hodgson of Murton in Lamplugh, and also report one other known son – George Hodgson, born 8th month 2, 1668. (Those minutes, in their quaint language, read: “1666 – Robert, the son of John Hodgson of Lamplugh with Eliner his wife bare unto him was born the 10 [day] 9 [month]” and “1668 – George, the son of John Hodgson of Lamplugh with Eliner his wife bare to him born the 2 / 8”

When Robert arrives in Lurgan, at age 14, one of the prominent Quakers was George Hodgson, quite likely his uncle.

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Lamplugh, Cumbria

Lamplugh ...

Lamplugh today appears largely unchanged from the 1600s.

Lamplugh ...

Rural Lamplugh is one of the townships in Cumbria, in England’s northwest corner. It is set between the Irish Sea and the Lakes Region.

Lumplugh 3

Lamplugh was likely a difficult place to eke out a living, even for yeomen like my Hodgsons.

 

 

Lurgan, Ireland

Lurgan is the oldest Quaker meeting in Ireland. Hodgsons subscribed to the construction of this meetinghouse.

Lurgan is the oldest Quaker meeting in Ireland. Hodgsons subscribed to the construction of this meetinghouse in 1696 to accommodate their growing community.

1658 Lynastown Friends burial ground in Ireland likely contains some of my ancestors, buried in unmarked graves as was the Quaker custom.

1658 Lynastown Friends burial ground in Ireland likely contains some of my ancestors, buried in unmarked graves as was the Quaker custom.

 

 

Generation four: the Irish Connection

For now, any consideration of Orphan George Hodgson’s roots coming from Cumbria and then Ireland remain conjectural, based largely on Jeremiah Mills’ undated and all-too-brief notes from the early 1800s recounting the Hodgson family’s disastrous passage to the New World from Ireland or northwest England. Even so, this is what I have.

Central to the argument are the surviving records of Lurgan Friends Meeting. Arising from the traveling ministry of William Edmondson in 1654, Lurgan Monthly Meeting in Armagh is the oldest Quaker institution in Ireland.

The Lurgan picture becomes complicated, first, by the badly faded ink on many of the minutes recording Quaker families, second, by gaps in the records themselves, and, third, by the existence of a cluster of Hodgsons as part of the Lurgan Friends community. In addition, the first surviving page of the Lurgan minutes begins in 1675, two decades after the Meeting’s founding.

Nor can all of the gaps in the Lurgan minutes be blamed on faded ink or missing pages. In 1691 the men’s meeting noted “the Booke of record of Certificates of Marriages, Birthes & Burialls belonging to this meeting having for some years past been entrusted to ye care of John Dobb, & he now being absent & not in this nation … ye said Booke hath not been duely kept as formerly.”

But, as Chris Dickinson confirmed in a e-mail, “You are absolutely right that the Hodgsons of Lurgan came from Murton in Lamplugh in Cumberland.”

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Old Swede’s

The known trail for George Hodgson starts in the parish records here, when he wed Mary Thatcher. They were eloping, and violating Quaker discipline.

The known trail for George Hodgson starts in the parish records here, when he wed Mary Thatcher. They were eloping, and violating Quaker discipline.

The church, now Episcopal, is older than the surrounding city of Wilmington, Delaware.

The church, now Episcopal, is older than the surrounding city of Wilmington, Delaware.

From the side.

From the side.